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mercedes benz lives by to this day. the best, or nothing. that is what drives us. >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. ♪ >> from our studios in new york city, this is "charlie rose." ♪ >> charlie: sebastian pinera was elected president of chile in january with a mandate to create jobs and bolster the economy. he is chile's third richest citizen. 13 days before he took office, his country suffered one of the most devastating earthquakes in recorded history. he dubbed himself the reconstruction president and made earthquake recovery his top priority. he is here in new york for the united nations general assembly. i am very pleased to have him here at this table for the first time. first of all, welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> charlie: tell me about the earthquake and how you approached that. >> it was the fifth worst earthquake in the known history of mankind, and it s devastating. it was 10 days before we took office, and it really cost us first of all more than 500 lives. there are
is not very solid. it's about $30 sml a years which which is peanuts compared to what the u.s. has with china, with the european union. but the potential is huge. >> rose: and we conclude with one of the most interesting entrepreneurs in all of china, he is jack ma. his company is alled alibaba. >> core competence of our companies, we have 20,000, grow from 18 people, now 20,000 people. and we focus a lot on the making sure the culture, everybody works for helping others instead of just making money. and we believe different from wall street, we believe customer number one, employee two, shareholder three. >> rose: customer one, employee, two, shareholder three? >> yes, again, this is my religion. >> rose: russia and the world, china and technology when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: president obama came to office promising to reset relations with russia. he and russian president dmitry medvedev appeared to form a personal bond. they have since signed a nuclear arms reduction treaty-- now waiting to be
is important and facebook is a consequence and very impressive company. and social information will be used by google and by others, i should add, to make the quality of the results, the quality of the experience that much better. the pore we foe about what your friends do with your permission, and i need to say that about 500 times, we can actually use that to improve the experience you have of getting information that you care about. in our case what we're actually do something building social information into all of our products. so it won't be a social network the way people think of facebook but rather social information about who your friends are, people that you interact with. and we have various ways in which we will be collecting that information. >> we continue with the film wall street money never sleeps with the director all i ver stone and two of the jars, josh brolin and shia labeouf. >> the 2 o 008 market is more difficult to understand with credit default swaps and insurance and all that stuff. but we made it a background. that's the way we treated it. we treated the crisis,
and doesn't help the u.s. economic recovery. but geithner said he was not prepared to label china a "currency manipulator" under u.s. law. >> tom: that reluctance was all too familiar to members of congress, and they grilled geithner with hostile questions. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: even the senators grilling the treasury secretary today admit hearings on china's overvalued currency have become something of a ritual over the years. it begins with the expression of outrage from senators like new york's charles schumer. >> at a time when the u.s. economy is trying to pick itself up off the ground, china's currency manipulation is like a boot to the throat of our recovery. and this administration refuses to try to take that boot off our neck. >> reporter: then, it's the treasury secretary's turn to share concern, to offer tougher rhetoric, and then to explain that declaring china a currency manipulator under the current law will do little more than require more consultations, as treasury secretary geithner explained today. >> wishing something does not make it so, and issuin
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: the u.s. moved into what is planned as its final military phase in iraq today after ending its combat role. newshour correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> reporter: cleaning up and packing-- that's what u.s. soldiers were doing on bases across iraq today. humvees rolled on to flatbed trucks and rows of equipment awaited transport home. last night, president obama marked the formal end of combat operations in iraq with a speech from the oval office. >> our combat mission is ending, but our commitment to iraq's future is not. this new approach reflects our long-term partnership with iraq , one based upon mutual interest and mutual respect. >> reporter: today, american military leaders marked the occasion with a change in command of the remaining 50,000 troops in iraq. vice president biden and defense secretary gates were among those presiding at the main u.s. military headquarters on the outskirts of baghdad. >> i pray that all those scarred by this war in iraq come to know the bond of lasting peac
. >> reporter: vincent reinhart used to help the fed meet its dual mandate as a senior policy adviser. with unemployment at close to 10%, he says it's clear the economy isn't operating anywhere close to maximum employment, which is closer to 5%. and what about price stability? indicators of core inflation are under 1%, with many prices flat or falling. but that isn't the same as price stability. >> it's possible to have too much of a good thing. >> reporter: why? because periods of high unemployment tend to push prices down and prices are not stable when they are rising or falling too much. >> as inflation starts falling and maybe even veering into deflation, the real value of what you have to pay back goes up and up and up. so it's harder for people who borrow, including the u.s. government, in that regard. >> reporter: with the fed failing to meet either of its mandates, economist josh bivens says the conclusion is clear. >> you're missing both mandates, but in the same direction for once. we're not acting aggressively enough to drive down unemployment, and we're not even acting agg
to close their markets. >> susie: that's u.s. trade rep ron kirk. he joins us for an exclusive interview about our trade issues with china. you're watching "nightly business report" for thursday, september 23. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. president obama today met with china's premier in new york city, and, susie the leaders of the world's two biggest economies pledged to work together on boosting the global recovery. >> susie: but tom, in their public remarks, the men didn't talk about china's undervalued currency. instead, that's said to have topped the agenda for their private meeting. the issue-- keeping china's currency artificially low puts american exports at a disadvantage overseas. >> tom: lawmakers in washington, meantime, are closer than ever to acting on threats to penalize china over its currency. earlier today, i c
in disguise because it has forced us to double of rate of our productivity and have no doubt that inherent in our spirit the more enemies we have, the more united and hard we work. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad for the hour. next. >> rose: mahmoud ahmadinejad, the president of iran, is back in new york city. the rituals of his yearly visit are now familiar. he speaks to members of the press, he holds breakfast meetings and a lot of other meetings at the united nations. he address it is u.n. general assembly. his strip often accompanied by developing events. this year was the release of american hiker sarah shourd while two other hikers-- shane bauer and joshua fatale-- remain in an iranian jail accused of espionage. iran has been sanctioned four times by the security council for its failure to comply with the u.n. nuclear investigative agency the i.a.e.a. the obama administration, europe japan and even some arab nations have followed with some additional sanctions. some are very clear that a military strike should remain on the table if the sanctions does not work. one of those is former pr
in europe and the possible threat in the u.s. >> brown: margaret warner examines china's growing economic and military assertiveness in asia and globally. >> they're breaking diplomatic egg which is three or four years ago they would not have broken. so i think the change is palpable. >> woodruff: we talk to former clinton administration secretary of labor robert reich-- the last in our series of conversations on extending the bush-era tax breaks. >> brown: and jonathan miller of "independent television news" reports from northwest pakistan, where relief-aid is still slow in coming two months after the floods began. >> this is one of the worst affected areas in pakistan, but these people industrial no safe water, no food, no shelter, no medicine. something has gone very wrong. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i want to know what the universe... >> looks like. >> feels like. >> from deep space. >> to a microbe. >> i can contribute to the world by pursuing my passion for science. >> it really is the key to the
on the people, especially the children. >> they're getting to the heart of the matter. u.s. middle east envoy george mitchell's assessment of the talks between israelis and palestinians. a senior vatican official describes the uk as a third world country. he has pulled out of the pope's statement. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america, also run the globe. coming up later, outside, the streets ring with protests. inside, france's lower house passes the bill which will raise the retirement age from 60 to 62, and serving therapy. can riding a wave help you call for mental health problems? public service is putting in health care money to find out. hello to you. millions -- yes, millions -- of people are going hungry at this moment across central and western africa. the worst affected country is niger, a country even larger than the united states of california and texas together, but with a population of just 15 million. the drought's amid flooding of ruined crops. help has not been enough. we go to niger for this special report. >> according to the united nations, in development terms, niger
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. the u.s. treasury and insurance giant a.i.g. unveiled a plan today to speed up the repayment of more than $100 billion in federal bailout money. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, economic writers louise story of the "new york times" and roben farzad of "bloomberg business week" weigh the pluses and minuses of the deal. >> brown: then, kwame holman looks at the down-to-the-wire scramble as congress pushed to adjourn just weeks ahead of the midterm elections. >> suarez: judy woodruff talks to speaker of the house nancy pelosi about the battle over tax cuts and the stakes for democrats in november. >> our members left congress last night. they are confident that they would return in the majority. >> brown: special correspondent miles o'brien reports on a mississippi community's plan to use stimulus money for mass transit in rural areas. >> suarez: betty ann bowser updates the johnson and johnson story as company executives and the f.d.a. come under fire on capitol hill fo
audible on wall street today, and in the offices of many u.s. banks. not only are the new capital standards looser than expected, but there's nearly a ten-year phase-in-- considered an eternity in the marketplace. experts say the so-called basel 3 requirements eliminate some uncertainty for financial stock investors, who were worried the rules would be tougher. k.b.w.'s fred cannon says, more importantly, they should help banks do business more cautiously. >> it means that there is risk retention for the banks. if they make a loan or do a mortgage securitization or subprime loan, they are going to have to take some risk and hold it on their balance sheet. and, that's a good thing because that's clearly one of the issues that got us into trouble a couple of years ago. >> reporter: some experts also believe the new capital standards will result in the return of juicy dividends, something that's been missing since the financial crisis unfolded. >> the banks have been precluded from paying dividends because they didn't know what capital needed to be, and they had to keep it all. now w
why she left islam. >> i would never use the expression anti-islamic sentiment. i think it's more precise to distinguish between political islam on the one hand and religious islam and spiritual islam. and i have seen, yes, a growing knowledge on political islam, a growing interest in political islam, and a growing condemnation of political islam by more and more americans. i find both american men and women audiences that i speak condemn practices in the name of islam against women, the forced veiling of women, forced marriages of women, the guardian principle. there have been some eye-catching stories, for instance the 18-year old yemeni girl who was married off to an 80-year old man and who managed to escape that. so there is condemnation of these practices and there is condemnation of honor killings, condemnation of female genital mutilation. that is not a command in the koran, but in some obscure hadith, but practiced widely in muslim countries and among muslim immigrants to the u.s. >> so, does the thing that ms. a alreadyi mention done against women who are muslim cause som
-tongued rhetoric which dragged us into it. a lot of people thought it was a good idea and yet now conveniently within britain and many other countries it's blamed on this george bush and his cleverred-tonged mood until tony blair. think think he wants to say, no i was a bigger figure than that. >> rose: also from london, an old friend of this program, john burns now the london bureau chief of the "new york times". >> we were perhaps transfixed by the relief would come to iraq with the overthrowing of saddam and yes maybe we should have spent more time difficult as it would have been under saddam to look at the trauma, the psychological trauma inflicted on iraq by the ba'ath party and saddam over a period of 30 years. all of that it can accept. if i had to do it over again i would have looked at that because it was the fractured pitch thatter that society in part along with saddam terror overground as government going underground as an insurgency that made the american venture in iraq next to impossible to achieve. >> couric: from london john and john when we come back. captioning sponsored by
cry from 1994's "contract with america," and the grand signing ceremony on the steps of the u.s. capitol. today, house republican leaders appeared in shirt sleeves at a hardware and lumber store in suburban virginia 30 miles from capitol hill with this year's policy prescriptions. minority leader john boehner and his top lieutenants spelled out their central point. >> government is out of control in washington, and we need to rein it in, and begin a new drive for a smaller, less costly and more accountable government in our nation's capital. these are the things that the american people are demanding, >> reporter: while the backdrop has changed, republicans hope their document, called "a pledge to america," will produce similar results to 1994. that year's plan helped the party gain 54 seats and take the house majority for the first time in 40 years. one of the main architects of the 2010 version is california's kevin mccarthy. he accused democrats of ignoring the country's wishes. >> from the billion dollar bailouts to the stimulus package that failed to stimulate, to the gover
difficulties or challenges which might come from the mineral development, this would be the issue for us. >> rose: china and mongolia next. words alone aren't enough. our job is to listen and find ways to help workers who lost their jobs to the spill. i'm iris cross. we'll keep restoring the jobs, tourist beaches, and businesses impacted by the spill. we've paid over $400 million in claims and set up a $20 billion independently-run claims fund. i was born in new orleans. my family still lives here. i'm gonna be here until we make this right. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tung chee hwa is here. he is the chairman of the china united states exchange foundation. it aims to build greater understanding between the world's two largest economies. he is the former chief executive of hong kong, he has a long, close tie with the chinese leadership. he is currently vice chairman of the national committee of the chinese people's political consultant conference, the mainland's top political advisory body. i am very please
more buyers in the u.s. last month. sales rose 15% as it continues to see its american business grow. i went today to a mercedes dealership in union, new jersey, to find out what's driving those robust sales. it's an alphabet of success stories. "c" class, "e" class, "s" class, and even the s.l.s. no matter which mercedes it is, consumers are driving off with these luxury sedans. sales of the new e-class models are up 71% so far this year, and-- for all mercedes vehicles sold in the u.s.-- up more than 22%. the c.e.o. of mercedes u.s.a. expects business for the german automaker will stay in the fast lane. >> i think we'll be able to keep that pace. we were hoping for a little bit of an increase, but we're happy if it stays on that level. there is a good chance it will. but we'll have to wait and see what september brings. >> susie: ernst, in this type economy, how is it consumers can buy a new car, let alone a mercedes. >> i think a lot of people are at the point where they do need a new car. they're hesitant, but they need it, and they're looking around and looking for good value and n
was the chief architect of the financial global crisis that is still hurting the u.s. and last year's $787 billion stimulous program was largely summer's idea and he defended it. >> i think the stimulous had a significant impact. tens and thousands of teachers and cops across the country. $53billion delivered to american families. 3,000 projects underway that the calculations suggest that its impact is only going to increase. that we are also seeing 200,000 mortgages have been relieved. it's going to be 500,000 by november 1. i think we are on the right track. >> dr. summers is the third high profile member of president obama's economic team to quit before the end of the president's first two years in office. budget director, peter orszag was the first to leave in july. christina roma was next. the white house is also expecting rahm emanuel to leave the use to run for mayor of chicago. >> if rahm emanuel leaves, he will be the fourth of president obama's closest advisers to have left since july. question, after 20 months, is this presidential staff turnover normal? pat buchanan. >> thi
to start rebuilding. we want to make everything clean and tidy. we are asking the government to help us. >> but the numbers are overwhelming. at last count, 18.6 million people have been affected, and losses could exceed 28 billion pounds. the government has promised initial payment of 120 pounds. the 13-year-old wants to be a doctor. she and all these children are living in classrooms next door. they and their families will be homeless again soon when school starts. >> let's round of some other main news. he said he made a mistake in accusing syria of assassinating his father. he was killed in 2005. he describes his words as a political accusation made too quickly. syria has always denied involvement. rescue teams have resumed their search for survivors of mud slide. authorities say 44 people have died. thousands more are at risk of flooding and landslides. south african trade unions have suspended their strike. more than 1 million civil servants will see the pay rise. union members say they will consider the latest offer. the spanish government has dismissed a cease-fire as insufficie
reporter in washington for as -- bob woodward is still making waves. >> our reporter in washington for us. let's go to new york with our correspondent. barbara, even in a time of austerity, the u.s. has to live up to its aid and given the responsibilities, but he seems to want nothing less than an entirely new responsibilities -- has to live up to its aid and other responsibilities, but he seems to want nothing less than new responsibilities. >> this is a much broader theme that it involves, trade policy and investment policy and things like that. instead of food aid, for instance, he might invest in the agricultural sector, and some have welcomed this more structural approach to trying to stop poverty, but it is said that president obama did not commit any new money to the millennium development goals, even though america is very bar behind -- far behind the goals it set tenures ago. >> barbara, -- the goals it set 10 years ago. >> barbara, what about this new role? >> i think what he is going to be tried to do is have a result -- he is going to be trying to have a new result. rather tha
. and would indicate that it's going to take us quite a while before we get to full employment. >> susie: so if the economy grows 3.5% or more, as you're projecting, but the unemployment rate stays high, would you think that the fed has done its job? >> right now we're missing on both of our objectives. the inflation rate is too low and the unemployment rate is too high. so directionally i think it fairly clear which direction we should be moving. how much we should do and exact timing, that's a difficult question that requires a consensus, and that's why we have these meetings every six weeks. but it's clear right now that we're not where we want to be and we need to take some action to get there. >> susie: you can read the transcript of my entire interview with eric rosengren on our website. you'll find it on n.b.r. on pbs.org. >> tom: here are the stories in tonight's n.b.r. newswheel: stocks slipped. the dow fell 22 points, the nasdaq and the s&p 500 were both off about three points. trading volume was down a little on the big board from yesterday, but still over one billion shares. on t
. mark may have a different opinion about that, but i think that that's probably a bad sign for us. but the other part of that sign, charlie, if i were a democrat, for instance, running for the house or for the senate somewhere else in the country, i'd look at that delaware outcome and i'd say we have one more piece of evidence that the right in this country, the conservative base of voters, is enormously energized. they're going to turn out if large numbers. they turned out last night to defeat a moderate republican. but they're all going to vote in november and they're all going to vote against the democrats. >> rose: mark? >> i agree with that. in the short term the republicans suffer because they've take an sure win and made it a very likely loss and that what's likely necessary to get the ten seats they need to take back the majority. i agree between now and november this is an unaloyed good for the republicans except to the exsent that the democrats suck sneed what they're trying to do which is to define the entire republican party as captive to the tea party. i don't think i
family housing as an investment. if the three of us decided to go in together on a real estate investment and i said i have a plan. we'll build a 3,000 square foot house that will fit only one family you would say to me that's not a very good plan. we should bill a building where we can maximize the amount of rent that flows through it and have people with just as much living space as they need. the single family house in america is a poor investment by design. go back 30 years and you had houses that were 1700 square feet. today they've come down over the past year a little bit but they're still 2400 square feet own though the size of the average american family has gotten smaller over that time. clearly houses today are mostly consumption. they're not designed for investment. there's nothing wrong with home ownership. just don't go into it thinking you're going to get rich. go into it because you have a lot of money and you want something nice. >> brown: carl case, what do you think about that? >> i agree with that. there are negative surprises that happen when you buy a home too. i mea
to go nuclear or not, i think the thing that would make them go nuclear is for us to continue to threaten to attack them even with nuclear weapons, either us or the israelis and not communicate with them. so i would communicate with them and stop threatening them. jup we conclude with the new movie about facebook. it's called "president social network, we have the director david fincher and the screen writer aaron sorkin. >> you never want to present a carkner a movie that you don't empathize with. it was not a character assassination. we were... we had a guy who from certain perspectives he was a judas and he had betrayed his friend. obviously that's a specific point of view. >> at the sender is a very modern invention but the story is as old as story telling itself, of friendship and loyalty and betrayal and power and class and things that shakespeare would have written about and it's lucky for me that none of these guys were available so i got to write about it. >> rose: jimmy carter, aaron sorkin and david fincher when we continue. words alone aren't enough. workers who lo
the government to help us. but the numbers are overwhelming. at last count, 18.6 million people have been affected and pakistan's losses could exceed 28 billion pounds. the government has promised most affected families an initial payment of 150 pounds. woman backgive this her home. -- of this girl back home. the 13-year-old wants to be a doctor. these children and their families will be homeless again as school starts. >> the lebanese prime inner circle -- prime minister has saad hariri said he made a mistake in accusing syria of assassinating his father. mr. hariri has described his words as a political accusation made prematurely. he said lebanon and his -- and syria have historic relations and investigations into his father's killing have been misled by false testimony. rescue teams in guatemala removed -- resume their search for survivors after heavy mud slides and rain. authorities say at least 40 people have died. hundreds have been released -- remove from their homes and thousands more have been displaced by flooding and mudslides. more than 1 million civil servants walked out, de
. and now the government tolerates night markets, where people can sell in the streets. police used to stop this kind of thing. now they let it happen. >> it signals there will be a very stable transition. and in north korea. it will take longer than one or three years. >> there is one other important player behind the scenes today, and that is china. china may be worried that north korea will inflow of with incalculable consequences for the in -- will in flowed with incalculable consequences for the entire region so, it is that closed mysterious country across the river -- it could mean that changes on the way for the family business. >> john since then, our world affairs editor there. at least seven people are confirmed killed. the rain collapsed a hillside, burying people in their homes as they slept. rescue workers have been struggling to reach the scene. 30 died in a mudslide in colombia. emergency services say the scale of the slide has made it rescue difficult across the country. 74 died in recent heavy rains. an egyptian court has reduced the sentence on a billionaire accused of kil
%. give us the lowest corporation tax in the g-7. and that is a huge advert in this program, by the way, it is a good low corporate tax environment. >> rose: that's what ireland did exactly. >> and i think now they were able to take it quite a lot further than 24%. but nevertheless, from we're taking it from 28% to 24%. if you think of many people in my situation, many people sitting in a room like this, in faced with a very high budget deficit we would be very tempted to put up business taxes. but because, precisely because i want to give-- given growth and private sector investment and job creation, that i'm actually going in the other direction and reducing business taxes. >> rose: but the president is making in the united states the exact opposite decision. >> every country has got to make his own decisions. and the american administration has got challenges just like the british government has got. challenges. but actually, if you look at, from what i can gather, the u.s. administration is concerned about infrastructure. we've concerned about infrastructure. we're protecting the ca
and that's going to be enormously difficult. >> rose: in u.s. they are not just cutting fat they are cutting to the muscle. >> they are cutting it back in a big way. >> they have to do two things, make the case for paring back and cutting back in public spending without cuting the roots of future economic growth in this country. therefore, focus on your priorities. don't just take out sort of an axe across the whole waterfront of public spending and investment. make sure that as you make your savings, cut down your expenditure, make your economy, do not axe those things on which our future economic growth depend. >> this new government here will be doing some difficult things. and people will be reminded of the fact that the decision makers-- . >> rose: but are you in favor of them doing difficult things i understand. >> i am favor of them doing difficult things but i think it also alters the way you people look at domestic policy. >> rose: i poke to george osborne about these and other issues today in an interview earlier at his office here in london. >> here is that conver
is the biggest threat to the world. they use chemical, biological or nuclear weapons if they could. western policies are not designed to confront radical islam. the chinese government ordered three producers to start growing more vegetables. it is another reason this is causing unrest. seven people died in mozambique over the rising cost of bread. the food agencies called for a special meeting to discuss the implications of a price spike. >> more wildfires in southern russia stand by strong winds and more loss of life after 50 people were killed in july and august. underlying it all is the prolonged drought. they destroyed 20% of the wheat crop this year. the government has extended its ban on wheat exports. thousands of kilometers away in mozambique's lies [unintelligible] after two days of food riots. this was a sharp rise in the cost of bread. seven people were killed when police opened fire on protesters trip nearly 300 were injured. what is happening to food prices? is there a risk of a repeat of the food crisis of 2008? from 2003 on the world saw prices climbing. the global food index
or not confident that life for our children's generation will be better than it has been for us? 66% do not kill confidence. is america in a state of decline? 65% believe the country is in a state of decline. how do you come back from that? >> it is tough to do. historically, internationally, the u.s. has been the home office of national optimism. optimism breed confidence. if you are optimistic about the future, you can take a chance, whether it is the gi bill, air, water, pollution act's that made a difference. when people lack confidence, there is a sense of hunkering down, i cannot be concerned about other people. it makes me a lot more self concerned. it has a political ripple effect that is enormous. i do not think it has been totally calculated. >> the president says we will put money into infrastructure. john boehner wants to cut spending. how does that instill confidence in the american people? >> it does not compute to the average person. it is said that macroeconomics will benefit the system, but why do people not feel that? politicians in both parties have sort of lost credibility. i
. siemens. answers. >> president obama tells the bbc the iranian president's comments concerning the u.s. involvement in september 11 are and what absolutely unacceptable." japan releases a fishing boat captain as a result of on major routes with china. and it india is assessing whether it is fit you hold the commonwealth games. welcome to "bbc world news and america. coming up later for you -- where are their sons? mothers are demanding answers. end to the auction ram. an investment bank goes under the hammer. in an exclusive interview with bbc television, president obama has described comments made by president ahmadinejad as inexcusable. earlier, speaking at the united nations, the iranian leader speculated the american government may have been involved in september 11, 2001. mr. obama also emphasized that he thinks that president and manager of's views are out of sync with the iranian people. >> it was offensive. it was hateful. and particularly for him to make this statement here in manhattan, just a little north of ground zero, where families lost their loved ones, people of all fa
facing the world. -- greatest threat facing the world. they would use chemical or nuclear weapons if they could. the chinese government ordered food producers to start growing more comfortable -- growing more vegetables. in mozambique, seven people died this week in protests about the 30% rise of the cost of bread. the un called for a special meeting to discuss the implications of a price spike. >> more wild fires fanned by strong winds and more houses destroyed and more loss of life after 50 people were killed in july and august. underlying it all is a prolonged drought. they destroyed 20% of russia's wheat crop. the government extended its ban on wheat exports to compensate. thousands of kilometers away in mozambique's plight is starting to return to normal. the trigger was a sharp rise in the cost of bread. the government insisted it had no choice but to raise prices. seven people were killed. nearly 300 were injured. this has left extensive damage. what is happening to food prices? is there a risk of a repeat of the food crisis of 2008? the world saul price climbed -- saw pric
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)